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Installation with living coral, human bones, machines and various material, active between February 2012 and January 2013.

The centenary remains of a man, the millenary life of a very simple creature:

Gilliatt is coral and bone, Gilliatt is an art piece, literally alive.

More than an art piece, he is a process in perpetual development.

With the project to breathe new life into an ancient fellow human comes the birth of a marine sepulture, palpitating and silent.

With the project to breathe new life into an ancient fellow human comes the birth of a marine sepulture, palpitating and silent.

His greening skull welcomes a planktonic population, a flora and fauna which runs his organism.

His greening skull welcomes a planktonic population, a flora and fauna which runs his organism.

Throughout his existence his flesh will bloom, his coraline skeleton will develop, illuminating his last remains, covering the human vanitas.

Throughout his existence his flesh will bloom, his coraline skeleton will develop, illuminating his last remains, covering the human vanitas.

Gilliatt’s is a world without end, his potential for growth infinite; his offspring, artistic transplants of human and animal life.

Gilliatt’s is a world without end, his potential for growth infinite; his offspring, artistic transplants of human and animal life.

The new existence of Gilliatt is, however, fragile, subtle and still largely alien to us. Heavy machinery is needed to create a viable ecosystem, trying to recreate the infinity of the ocean inside walls of glass.

The new existence of Gilliatt is, however, fragile, subtle and still largely alien to us. Heavy machinery is needed to create a viable ecosystem, trying to recreate the infinity of the ocean inside walls of glass.

Gilliatt asks of us all the attention given to an art piece, all the respect due to living beings, all the responsibility that the creative gesture made us capable of.

Gilliatt asks of us all the attention given to an art piece, all the respect due to living beings, all the responsibility that the creative gesture made us capable of.

Gilliatt is a piece about life, made by life. Without care, in death, his artistic existence would cease.

Gilliatt is a piece about life, made by life. Without care, in death, his artistic existence would cease.

An aquarium is an aquatic oddity suspended in our universe, where only a man without lungs can prosper.

Gilliatt reminds us of our responsibilities to the world,
puts our existence in perspective
and affirms that death on earth is only a bridge from life to life.

“Dreams are the aquariums of the night.”
Victor Hugo, Toilers of the Sea

  • Installation with living coral, human bones, machines and various material, biologically active since February 2012.

The centenary remains of a man, the millenary life of a very simple creature:

Gilliatt is coral and bone, Gilliatt is an art piece, literally alive.

More than an art piece, he is a process in perpetual development.

With the project to breathe new life into an ancient fellow human comes the birth of a marine sepulture, palpitating and silent.

His greening skull welcomes a planktonic population, a flora and fauna which runs his organism.

Throughout his existence his flesh will bloom, his coraline skeleton will develop, illuminating his last remains, covering the human vanitas.

Gilliatt’s is a world without end, his potential for growth infinite; his offspring, artistic transplants of human and animal life.

The new existence of Gilliatt is, however, fragile, subtle and still largely alien to us. Heavy machinery is needed to create a viable ecosystem, trying to recreate the infinity of the ocean inside walls of glass.

Gilliatt asks of us all the attention given to an art piece, all the respect due to living beings, all the responsibility that the creative gesture made us capable of.

Gilliatt is a piece about life, made by life. Without care, in death, his artistic existence would cease.

An aquarium is an aquatic oddity suspended in our universe, where only a man without lungs can prosper.

Gilliatt reminds us of our responsibilities to the world,
puts our existence in perspective
and affirms that death on earth is only a bridge from life to life.

Dreams are the aquariums of the night.
Victor Hugo, Toilers of the Sea